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How To Dodge and Burn Effectively in Photoshop

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Dodging and burning is one of the oldest and most essential photo editing techniques. In this featured video, Jimmy McIntyre shows you why the most widely used techniques to dodge and burn are not really the best and how to apply dodging and burning in a more refined and controllable way.
Ansel Adams' equipment.

How to deal with trolls that attack your photos

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Whenever you create something notable and share it with the world, you're going to receive criticism. Especially if you're just starting out, this can be terrifying. In this thoughtful and inspiring video, photographer and filmmaker Sean Tucker gives some great advice on how to deal with different types of critique. In particular, he gives you some insight and advice on what drives trolls to put you down and how to deal with their destructive comments.
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Noise Stacking - How to Shoot at High ISO Without the Noise

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Shooting with a high ISO sensitivity naturally creates noisy images. We all know that. And removing that noise in post-production is difficult and impacts image quality. But there is actually a way to reduce the noise greatly even in high-ISO images with very little impact on the details in your image. And this technique does not require any noise reduction software or plugins.
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How to Sharpen a Really Noisy Image

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Noise and sharpening, don't go together well. If you sharpen a noisy image, the noise is sharpened too, making it even noisier. And if you apply noise reduction first, the image gets very soft and loses all the details that you may want to sharpen. It takes a few Photoshop tricks to get around this problem. In the video below, a photographer by the name Gabriel F shares a very interesting technique. He sharpens a really noisy image by extracting the details (including the edges to be sharpened) into a separate layer. Then he reduces the noise on that details layer and sharpens it subsequently. When he overlays this layer on the image, the noise is untouched while the edges are sharpened.
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How to Remove Anything from a Photo in Photoshop

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In a perfect world, there would be nothing disturbing the flawless look of your subject and its beautiful surroundings. Nothing would distract the viewers from enjoying the things you actually want to show them. But if you've taken a photo or two yourself, you know that the world if often pretty far away from perfect. Usually, when the composition is just right, there is something distracting in the photo. Sometimes you realize it but accept it since everything else looks great. On other occasions, you only notice it when you're back on your computer and inspect the images. In order to save images in these cases, you need some solid cloning skills to be able to remove those distracting elements from your photos. And you also need to have good knowledge about which type of distractions you are able to remove and which ones are problematic because removing them will leave telltale signs. In this featured video, Aaron Nace shows you a bunch of techniques for removing (almost) anything from your images.
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The Superresolution Trick - How to Quadruple the Resolution of Your Camera

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Have you ever dreamed of shooting with a megapixel monster camera and get images upwards of 50 Megapixel? Of course, these cameras are really expensive which means that they're out of reach for most of us, right? While that's true, there is a technique that allows you to create ultra-high resolution images even with an ordinary, entry-level camera. It's called Superresolution, and it's mostly done in post-production. In this featured video tutorial, Ian Normal shows you how to do this. With his 24 Mpx camera, he creates a series of 20 photos of the same scene and merges them together in Photoshop such that the combined image actually has 94 Mpx of resolution.
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6 Ways to Get Sharp Hand-Held Photos at Slow Shutter Speeds

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The best way to get really sharp photos at slow shutter speeds it to use a tripod. Your second-best bet is to use a monopod. But what if you simply cannot use any such tool? Are you walking away without getting any shot? You shouldn't, because there are techniques for stabilizing your camera even if you have to hand-hold it. We all know this situation: You're in this beautiful place, and you think you're just about to snap the best images ever. But while you're setting up your tripod a guy walk up to you explaining (more or less politely) that tripods are not allowed. Luckily, you also have your monopod with you. But you're told that that's not an option either. That's a major bummer.
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Frequency Separation for Dummies in Photoshop

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You may have heard of this technique called frequency separation where you magically separate the details in your image from the colors and tones to be able to manipulate both independently, right? It's used a lot in skin retouching, and it really gives you incredible flexibility. Variants of this technique are also used in landscape and architecture photography to really accentuate the details of an image without introducing artifacts like halos. In this featured video, David Biedny explains the technique and really shows you what it all means. This is the best tutorial on frequency separation I've seen to date. It really empowers you to make this powerful technique your own and use it to fit your photography.
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UV Filters - Do They Really Protect Your Lens?

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Wanna see a lot of glass being shattered... expensive glass? Yeah, me too! But for all you gear preservation activists on the other hand, this is not for you. You are going to feel extensive pain throughout the video and maybe irreparable brain damage. You probably know the old debate as to whether or not to use a UV filter to protect your lens. This is one of those topics that have a lot of myths revolving around them, and coming from scientific background, I like it when people actually put such concepts to a real-world (kinda-scientific) test. That's exactly what Steve Perry does in this featured video.
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Mirrorless vs DSLR - What's Right for You?

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We're seeing more and more videos from people who switched from a DSLR to a Mirrorless camera. That's all fine, interesting and sometimes emotional, but is it really objective and helpful? In this featured video by Matt Granger, he gives you an objective overview of the trade-offs you're facing when you make the switch. Matt's Point is this: For every benefit a mirrorless camera gives you, you will also lose something. Check out the video and the list below that summarizes those trade-offs.
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How to Fake a Long Exposure in Photoshop

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I bet you love long exposure photos. Who doesn't? But sometimes you discover just after you're back at your computer that a particular scene would have made for a great long exposure. Maybe you just did not realize it while you were at the location, maybe you had no ND filter with you to get those nice long shutter speeds and create a long exposure. Bummer! But maybe not all is lost here... In this featured video tutorial, Blake Rudis shows you how you can still create a long exposure effect in Photoshop from a regular (short exposure) photograph.
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11 Pro Tips for Composing your Photos - with Ian Plant

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Photographic composition - we all know the rules, right? And we all know that the first thing you learn is the Rule of Thirds. Well, here's a talk by one of the world's best landscape photographers, Ian Plant. Quite refreshingly, Ian does not talk about "rules", he talks about "tools of Composition", deliberately not mentioning the Rule of Thirds. Ian uses his stunning imagery to show you examples of very compelling compositions and dissects them to show you the tools he used to create them. The images alone are worth your time when you watch this video. Enjoy!
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How To Digitally Blend a Single RAW file by Jimmy McIntyre

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Digital blending is a technique by which you blend selected regions of one photo with regions from another photo to combine the best aspects of both images. Of course, this is also possible for set of more than two images. One typical use case is manual HDR where you blend the well-exposed areas of each photo in a bracketed series of shots. But digital blending techniques are not only applicable to multiple exposures. While that's usually how these techniques are used, you can actually use the same technique to blend a single photo with itself, or rather, with a different version of itself. In the video below, Jimmy McIntyre shows you the basics of this technique.
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5 Ways Blend If in Photoshop Will Blow Your Mind by Blake Rudis

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You may have stumbled across the Blend-If controls in the Layer Style dialog box in Photoshop. But chances are that you did not even notice them, let alone recognized that they are actually a very powerful tool. Blend-If is one of those tools that is not self-explanatory and that does not make you want to use it straight away. The reason is that, by itself, it does not do a lot other than letting you select a range of tones where the layer and the layer below are going to be blended together. Sounds cryptic? Watch the two videos in this post to gain some insights into this tool.