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Announcing PCS Video – Photography Education the Way It Should Be

PCS Video - Get your free trial course now!

On July 1st, we will be launching our brand new PCS Video platform. All our future Pro Video Courses will be running on this platform. It is a combination of software and video that is tightly integrated with resources like sample images, actions and presets that you need to learn about various photographic topics.

The core of the PCS Video platform is the PCS Player, a browser-based software that provides a learning environment for you (see below for some screenshots). On July 1st, you will get access to this software and the first free sample course that runs on the PCS Video platform. This allows you to download and test the system.

The first Pro PCS Video Course is scheduled to be released roughly one week later. If you subscribed to our email newsletter, you will get exclusive access way before the official release date at a special discount. So this is a perfect time to subscribe if you haven’t done so yet. You will even get a free ebook with your subscription.

If you want to learn more about the features of the PCS Video platform, check out this page for a detailed overview and a comparison with other video-based platforms. For a quick glance, read on!

Make sure you’re ready on July 1st to grab your free sample course.

Main PCS Video features in a nutshell

pcs-player-courses-panel

A living course library: Each course you acquire is stored in an easily accessible library. Switch between courses with two clicks. No searching on your hard drive, no fiddling with video files.

pcs-player-nav-panel

Non-linear viewing: The PCS Player provides different ways of cross-referencing other lessons and courses (bookmarks, the Lesson panel, cross-reference resources etc). You can use any of these to jump to a different part of the course at any time without losing track.

pcs-player-bookmarks-panel

Powerful bookmarking: Whenever you come across content that is of particular interest to you, you can easily create a bookmark and give it a meaningful name.

pcs-player-resources-panel

Resources integration: A PCS Video Course does not only contain video content. It also comes tightly integrated with other resources that really give your learning experience a whole new dimension.

Review: The Art of Black & White with Lightroom by Serge Ramelli

Serge-Ramelli---The-Art-of-Black-and-White

Serge Ramelli is a French Movie Producer, Photographer and Director. In his professional photography work, he mainly produces fine-art prints (e.g. for hotels). He is very active as a teacher, selling photography tutorials on his website and publishing a video podcast about different post-processing techniques on YouTube.

When he was in his 40s, Serge made the transition that many hobby photographers dream of: He quit his day job as sales person to become a professional photographer.

In his photography and in his teaching, it shows that he has come home to what he always wanted to be: a creative artist.

The Topic

Black & white photography is about much more than just taking the colors out of your images. It is about turning color into contrast. The act of taking the color out of a photo seems to be a sever limitation of the possible range of visual expression. But that is not necessarily true. In fact, it really opens up endless possibilities for working with the contrast of the image which is an art in itself.

It is challenging to make a black & white photo really work, and it requires a special workflow which is different for different types of photos.

The Tutorial

This video tutorial is really a series of videos in which Serge shows a number of different black & white techniques using different photos. He shows you how to use the different tools available in Lightroom and Nik Silver Efex Pro to turn different color photos into great black & white images.

While he goes along in the video and processes the images, Serge shows you a number of important tricks for getting the best results. For each photo, he presents the entire workflow, starting with the preparation of the RAw image, the retouching, the black & white conversion and finally the finishing touches. So, you will learn black & white from start to finish.

For each step, he points out the specific requirements for black & white photography. For example, removing blemishes and spots is more important than in color photography because the tones in the images are manipulated in a completely different way, making these artifacts more visible.

Throughout the 10 lessons of this course, you will become familiar with Serge’s workflow as he applies it to different photos and tweaks it for the specific properties of each image. This repetitive style of teaching turns out to be very effective.

Lesson Overview

  • In the first lesson, Serge shows you the basic workflow based on a regular photo shot during the day.
  • Lesson 2 teaches you the specific methods required for long exposure photos. This type of photo is particularly suitable for black & white conversion because of its smooth transitions and dramatic skies.
  • Lesson 3 is about converting a long exposure architecture shot – a very popular black & white subject.
  • Lesson 4 shows you how to convert a panorama photo. This lesson shows that you can actually deal with some common problems in panorama photography (changing exposure and color casts) very effectively by converting them to black & white.
  • Lesson 5 is based on the converted panorama photo and shows you how to add colors back in again by using a split-toning technique.
  • Lesson 6 shows you a selective color technique where you convert some parts of a photo to black & white while leaving the color in other parts.
  • In lesson 7, Serge shows you how to create black & white portraits
  • Lesson 8 introduces you to using the Nik Silver Efex Pro software for your black & white conversion. Silver Efex Pro is a software that is specifically dedicated to creating impressive black & white photos in a very efficient way.
  • In lesson 9, Serge talks about using Lightroom presets for your black & white conversion. Presets are a good way to start your work on an image and avoid doing all the basic work from scratch. The course comes with a bonus pack of black & white presets that you can easily install and use in your Lightroom software.
  • Finally, in lesson 10, Serge shows you how to give your photos a vintage film look by adding grain to them.

Other Things You’ll Learn

  • How to work on the contrast in your images selectively using gradient masks and adjustment brushes.
  • How to work with virtual copies of your images to create separate versions of an image.
  • Which gear you need. Specifically, Serge shows you how to get an inexpensive ND filter for long exposures.
  • How to use adjustment brushes in Lightroom.
  • How to do some basic skin retouching in black & white portraits.
  • In lesson 4, Serge even shows you a quick way to create an impressive panorama shot using Photoshop (a few tricks included).

The Style of Teaching

Serge has a very charming and relaxed style of teaching. The Frenchman in him comes though in his style of presenting things, which makes this a very relaxing and enjoyable but still very informative course. Serge take the time to explain all the steps in great detail. So, even if you are not an expert in Lightroom or image editing, you will find it easy to follow his explanations. Having said that, even experts can still pick up a lot of valuable insights and tips.

The Summary

The Pros The Cons
  • By seeing the techniques being applied to photos of different nature, you can really get a deep insight into the workflow.
  • You will pick up a lot of different tricks and tips as you watch the videos. Add then to your personal tool box!
  • Apart from learing about black & white post-production, you will also pick up a lot of general tips for working with Lightroom.
  • The original RAW images included in the course material make it very simple to follow along. As Serge explain the different techniques, you can simply try it yourself.
  • The included bonus Lightroom presets give you a quick start to your black & white work. If you want to, you can let Serge’s presets do the heavy lifting for you while you concentrate on tweaking them to your liking.
  • This video tutorial is a long one (well over 2 hours). So you should bring some time to really take in all the techniques Serge presents.
  • The course comes as a set of 10 individual videos. The fact that it is split into shorter lessons is positive as to gives the whole course a structure. But it can also be challenging to retain the overview and to find the pieces of information you found most interesting later one.

My Personal Tips for this Tutorial

Here are a few personal tips on how to work with this tutorial:

  • You should create a document where you take notes about this course as you consume it. Simply open a new Word file or a simple text file and write down the little tips and tricks you pick up while you are watching. Also write down the number of the lesson and the time index. This way, your learning process will be very effective, and you can build your own little path through the course.
  • Open the RAW photos that Serge provides with this course and try to replicate Serge’s steps as he goes along. Pause the video while you explore the different techniques until you’ve got your head around them. Combine this with the notebook technique sketched above and you will learn a ton from this course.

Review: Post Edgy Photoshop Techniques by Joel Grimes

Joel Grimes - Post Edgy Photoshop Techniques

Photo by Joel Grimes

Joel Grimes is a commercial advertising photographer based out of Denver, Colorado. He is best known for his edgy sports, action and beauty composites where he combines studio shots with location shots (mostly HDR) into incredible images.

He has worked for clients like AT&T, Case Logic, Goldman Sachs, Kodak, Nikon USA, Pentax USA, Philip Morris, Red Bull, Sony, Visa, Volvo, US Postal Service, Wacom and many others.

Apart from being a successful photographer, Joel is also a great teacher who gives a lot to the photography community in his tutorials, workshops and seminars.

The Topic

Compositing is a photographic technique by which several image elements that are shot separately are combined into a single image. In most cases, the photographer tries to create a believable final image that looks as realistic as possible, making the viewer believe that the scene was actually set up and photographed as it is presented in the image.

This technique has become a very important tool in commercial photography as it makes the process of creating an image very flexible. The elements (typically a subject in the foreground and a background scene) can be shot independently, and different subjects and backgrounds can be combined.

The challenge however, is to get visual properties like the perspective, the lighting, and the color balance right so that they are consistent across the entire image and allow for a perfect illusion.

The Tutorial

In this video, Joel shows you his entire workflow for creating the image you see at the top of this article. He is not holding back anything here. He starts with the RAW image from a portrait shoot of his subject and takes you through the key processing steps in Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop. You’ll learn how to go back and forth between these two key programs, use blending modes, adjustment layers in Photoshop and a few tricks to adjust the skin-tones and the overall look of your image.

Then, Joel shows you how to extract the model from the portrait shoot with the latest tools in Photoshop. You’ll learn how to use the Quick Select tool, Refine Edge and the Brush tool to create selections, including the most difficult parts of an image: the hair.

Next, you’ll learn how to combine your subject with an HDR background image. Joel explains how to create a consistent believable composite that “sell your audience that the subject is actually standing in front of that background”. He takes you through the steps of cleaning up and refining your subject’s mask. Then, he explains how to use techniques like dodge and burn to get the lighting right and create a perfect illusion. Joel even creates additional lighting effects that are consistent with the rest of the image.

Other Things You’ll Learn

  • How to use the liquify tool to work on little imperfections of your model
  • How to create an atmospheric mood on the background (glowing foggy look and light rays) to separate your subject from the background
  • How to use Photo Filter adjustment layers to match the color balance of the background with the color balance of your subject

The Style of Teaching

Joel is a teacher at heart and it shows in this video. But he is also a working professional with a sense for efficiency. Therefore, he does things fast. Some knowledge about Photoshop and its tools is required to follow along at Joel’s speed. Make sure you use the rewind button of your video player if he’s too fast. But despite the speed, he takes the time to explain things in a very accessible way.

The Summary

The Pros The Cons
  • Joel is a great teacher who presents the individual steps of his workflow in a very accessible way.
  • You’ll get a real insight into the workflow of one of the most successful advertisement photographers.
  • You’ll pick up some tricks that will help you beyond the type of images that Joel creates. You can apply these in a wide range of situations to get more out of your own images.
  • Joel will also share some of his philosophy about “selling the illusion” efficiently without getting tangled up in too many time-consuming details.
  • Photosho CS5 is used in the video. This is not the latest version, but the tools that are used are all applicable to Photoshop CS6 and CC.
  • Joel moves along fast. The video is 39 minutes long, so he does not waste any time on the basics. You should have some knowledge about these basics to get the most out of this video. But keep in mind, since you can always rewind and watch a section again, you can really work the video at your own pace.

My Personal Tips for this Tutorial

Here are a few personal tips on what to look out for in this tutorial:

  • Pay attention to how Joel uses the Quick Selection tool in combination with Refine Edge. This will help you solve 90% of your masking problems.
  • Check out the techniques for adding atmosphere to a location that are explained towards the end. You can also use these on normal (non-composite) images to add a bit of extra character.

Hands-on Photo Tip: Photomatix Pro 5 ‘Fusion Real-Estate’ Method

Photomatix Pro 5 Fusion Real Estate Method - screenReal-estate photographers are confronted with many situations where they need to capture the interior of a room and the view out of the windows in a single image. This is where HDR techniques can really help you capture such a scene and present this entire tonal range in your final image.

However, real-estate photos have to be as natural as possible. Therefore, tone mapping approaches are dismissed by most real estate photographers because getting a natural look with them is difficult.

Photomatix Pro 5 now has a really effective and simple new method called Fusion/Real-Estate that lets you take full control over the tonal range of your images while keeping them as natural as possible.

This video shows you how easy it is to apply this new method.

The Video Tutorial

 

HDR Making-of: Into the Open

This is the Making-of video for ‘Into the Open (HDR)‘. Watch how this image evolves through all the post-processing stages and stop at any position to inspect the parameter settings (see remarks below). This video shows the entire post-processing work starting with the pre-processing of the source photos all the way through to the finishing touches. Each major step is indicated by a subtitle. Watch it in full HD mode (1080p) full-screen and pause at any point to inspect the parameters I choose for the different tools involved in the post-processing.

Additional ressources

View the final result and read more information on the post-processing work here: Into the Open (HDR)‘. Take a look at the before-and-after comparison of this image, and download the source images to try for yourself and test your post-processing skills.

Into the Open (HDR)

Into the Open (HDR)

Before-and-after

HDR Before and After - Into the Open

Pics to play with

Into the Open (HDR) - Pics to play with - download the source images and test your processing skills

The normal-speed video tutorial

In the Hands-on Photo Tip below, you will learn how to apply the tone mapping technique used for this image.

Tips for watching the making-of video

This video is available in HD (1080p). Click the “YouTube” button to the lower right of the player above to go to the original video on YouTube. You will have to switch the player to “1080p” (click on the gear wheel) to watch the HD version!

  • In HD mode, you can stop at any position and see the exact parameter setting I applied. Use the knob on the time bar to move forward and backward as the video is paused.
The New Making-of Format Explained - farbspiel-photo.com

Here is a quick explanation of the new making-of format and how to use the different elements you see in the video (click to enlareg the diagram).

HDR Making-of: The Parliament (HDR)

This is the Making-of video for ‘The Parliament (HDR)‘. Watch how this image evolves through all the post-processing stages and stop at any position to inspect the parameter settings (see remarks below). This video shows the entire post-processing work starting with the HDR merging and the tone-mapping all the way through to the finishing touches. Each major step is indicated by a subtitle. Watch it in full HD mode (1080p) full-screen and pause at any point to inspect the parameters I choose for the different tools involved in the post-processing.

View the final result and read more information on the post-processing work here: The Parliament (HDR). Take a look at the before-and-after comparison of this image, and download the source images to try for yourself and test your post-processing skills.

Additional resources

The HDR image

The Parliament (HDR)

Before and after

HDR Before and After - The Parliament

Pics to play with

The Parliament (HDR) - Pics to play with - download the source images and test your processing skills

Remarks

  • This video is available in HD (1080p). Click the “YouTube” button to the lower right of the player above to go to the original video on YouTube. You will have to switch the player to “1080p” (click on the gear wheel) to watch the HD version!
  • In HD mode, you can stop at any position and see the exact parameter setting I applied. Use the knob on the time bar to move forward and backward as the video is paused.

Hands-on Photo Tips: How to create a spotlight effect in Photoshop

pano - Basilika St Martin - WeingartenIf your photos look flat and if you want to add some more interesting lighting effects to them in post-processing this tutorial is for you.

You should really try to get the lighting right in camera while you’re shooting. But sometimes, the light just isn’t right when you are shooting, or maybe you want to achieve some different look when you post-process the image. In those cases, you can fix the image to a certain degree. In this video, I am going to show you a simple trick for creating a spotlight effect in Photoshop to improve the overall lighting.

Tip

It’s best to watch this video at the highest resolution full-screen. Start the video below by clicking on it and activate 720p mode by using the gear wheel icon in the player. Then, click the icon that shows the four corners of a square. The player will go full-screen.

Watch the video

Subscribe to my YouTube channel

If you found this video helpful, subscribe to my YouTube Channel to see it directly whenever I publish a new video.

Learn HDR Vertorama Photography

Everything about the technique in one ebook

7 Chapters - 183 pages - 112 illustrations for $19.95. Subscribers get 20% off!

Hands-on Photo Tips: How to remove halos in your HDR images

How to remove HDR halos - Exyample

HDR halo removal – example: The original image is tonemapped with quite extreme parameters and exhibits notable halos (1). After the halo removal in Photoshop, the halos disappeared (2)

Are you getting halos in your HDR images? Sometimes, you find the perfect setting in your HDR software, but right at that setting, halos start showing up and ruin your image. These ugly bright fringes around high-contrast edges are a well-known and common problem in HDR photography. In this video, I will first go over some tips to avoid halos in the first place. Then I will show you how to get rid of them in Photoshop by darkening those halo regions selectively.

Tips

  1. It’s best to watch this video at the highest resolution full-screen. Start the video below by clicking on it and activate 720p mode by using the gear wheel icon in the player. Then, click the icon that shows the four corners of a square. The player will go full-screen.
  2. Go to the table of contents below to jump right to a specific section.
  3. To try the whole process yourself, download all the files at the end of this post.

Watch the video from the start…

…or jump straight to a specific topic

  • Introduction [00:11]
  • How to avoid halos in tonemapping [01:22]
  • Halo removal in Photoshop [03:07]
  • The principle idea [04:00]
  • How it works step-by-step [06:18]
  • Selecting the non-haloed parts (Quick Selection Tool) [07:02]
  • Refining your mask edges [08:59]
  • Creating a Levels layer (darkening) [11:03]
  • How to mask the halo region [12:43]
  • The before-and-after [15:26]
  • How to refine the halo mask [15:45]
  • Summary [16:20]

Download all the files to try it out yourself

How to remove halos in your HDR images - download package - farbspiel-photo.com

Click the icon above to download the package with all the files (284 MB).

If you want to check out the end result or try it out yourself, simply download this package. It contains the following:

  • The original RAW files (.NEF)
  • The RAW converter preset files (.xmp) created by Adobe Camera RAW in the conversion. Your RAW converter will load these and reproduce the settings I chose.
  • The 32-bit HDR file created by Photomatix (.exr). If you want to start with the tonemapping, simply load this file into your HDR software.
  • The Photomatix Pro 4.2 parameter file (.xmp). Load this file while you’re in the tonemapping settings of Photomatix to get the exact same settings I used in the tutorial.
  • The Photoshop file with all the magic in it (.psd). Open this file if you want to inspect the final result a bit closer.

Subscribe to my YouTube channel

If you found this video helpful, subscribe to my YouTube Channel to see it directly whenever I publish a new video.

 

Hands-on Photo Tips: Advanced Distortion Correction in Photoshop

Typical distortion found in many hand-held photographs

Typical distortion found in many hand-held photographs (caused by roll, yaw and pitch of the camera): We will fix this in Photoshop.

Getting your photos straight is one of the basic requirements of photography. Crooked horizon lines in landscapes and architecture photos where the horizontal lines in buildings lean towards one side are a real show stopper. The first thing you should always try to achieve is to get straight images straight out of your camera. Use spirit levels and align your shots carefully from a tripod. But in some cases, this is not possible or you have only limited time, or you’re forced to shoot hand-held.

This can result in photos that are not only rotated but distorted in complex ways with rotation around the roll, pitch and yaw axes. The effect is that the sensor plane is not parallel to the lines in the actual scene.

In this video tutorial, I am showing you

  1. How to correct such a complex distortion in post-processing by using the Transform tools in Photoshop.
  2. How to correct slight asymmetries using the Puppet Warp tool in Photoshop.

Make sure you watch the video in HD 1080p mode to see all the details.

The Making of – The Library (HDR Vertorama)

The Library (HDR Vertorama)

Go the photo page to see the final image and to get additional information on the post-processing.

Here is the Making-of video for ‘The Library (HDR Vertorama)‘. Watch how this image evolves through all the post-processing stages and stop at any position to inspect the parameter settings (see remarks below).

This video shows the entire post-processing work starting with the HDR merging and the tone-mapping in Photomatix, all the way through to the finishing touches in Photoshop. Each major step is explained by a subtitle.

Watch it in full HD mode (1080p) full-screen and pause at any point to inspect the parameters I choose for the different tools involved in the post-processing.

The Video

In a Nutshell

The Library (HDR Vertorama) - Before and after

Check out the before and after to see the major milestones of this image side-by-side.

An HDR Vertorama image is essentially a vertical panorama combined with HDR to capture an extremely wide vertical angle of view and all the tones in the scene. The scene is photographed from bottom to top, and each of the photographs overlaps with the previous one and the next one. Moreover, each of these photographs is actually an exposure series (usually 3 or more exposures) that is merged into an HDR image. These HDR images are then combined in a process called stitching.

Learn HDR Vertorama Photography

Everything about the technique in one ebook

7 Chapters - 183 pages - 112 illustrations for $19.95. Subscribers get 20% off!

How to Watch the Video

  • This video is available in HD (1080p). Click the “YouTube” button to the lower right of the player above to go to the original video on YouTube. You will have to switch the player to “1080p” (click on the gear wheel) to watch the HD version!
  • Switch the player to full-screen mode (squared icon at the lower right corner of the player area) to see all the details.
  • In HD mode, you can stop at any position and see the exact parameter setting I applied. Use the knob on the time bar to move forward and backward as the video is paused.
  • You can also use the arrow keys on your keyboard to jump backward and forward.

TWiT Photo Interview – Watch the Live Recording!

Klaus Herrmann on TWiT Photo - July 3 2012

Catherine Hall, Leo Laporte and I had a lot of fun together.

On Tuesday, July 3rd, I was a guest on TWiT Photo, the weekly photo show on the TWiT network hosted by Catherine Hall and Leo Laporte. In case you forgot to tune in live or if you live in an unfortunate time zone, here is the recording of the show for you. Jump right to the topic that you are interested in or scroll all the way down to watch it in full length.

We have had a lot of fun chatting about HDR Vertorama photography, online sharing, building a photography website and many other things. There should be lots of useful information in this video. Thanks again to Catherine and Leo for having me on the show and for giving me the opportunity to talk about my work.

Topics

Here is a run-down of the topics that we discussed. Simply click on one of the links to go straight to the respective spot in the video, or watch it in full length below.

Just to clarify: The thingy with the triangle right in the middle of my face is not my nose!!! ;-) Oh, and if you feel that there is something missing in my name, here is an additional ‘R’ for you. Print it, cut it out and glue it to your monitor, right into my surname. ;-)

Learn HDR Vertorama Photography

Everything about the technique in one ebook

7 Chapters - 183 pages - 112 illustrations for $19.95. Subscribers get 20% off!

The Making-of: High Five (HDR)

Here is the Making-of video for ‘High Five (HDR)‘. Watch how this image evolves through all the post-processing stages and stop at any position to inspect the parameter settings (see remarks below). This video shows the entire post-processing work starting with the HDR merging and the tone-mapping  all the way through to the finishing touches. Each major step is indicated by a subtitle. Watch it in full HD mode (1080p) full-screen and pause at any point to inspect the parameters I choose for the different tools involved in the post-processing.

View the final result and read more information on the post-processing work here: High Five (HDR). Take a look at the before-and-after comparison of this image, and download the source images to try for yourself and test your post-processing skills.

Remarks

  • This video is available in HD (1080p). Click the “YouTube” button to the lower right of the player above to go to the original video on YouTube. You will have to switch the player to “1080p” (click on the gear wheel) to watch the HD version!
  • In HD mode, you can stop at any position and see the exact parameter setting I applied. Use the knob on the time bar to move forward and backward as the video is paused.

New farbspiel YouTube Channel

New YouTube Channel - Featured ImageThose of you who follow farbspiel-photo.com closely may have noticed that I took a little hiatus over the last few weeks. The reason is not that I am exhausted or tired of what I do here – not at all! I am more fired up than ever and full of exciting new plans. I just needed some time to step up the game a few notches and to provide you not only with new content, but with new content formats.

Video has already been a part of my content for some time now. I used it to present my Making-of features to you. These are time-lapse videos of the entire process of making specific images. They have been fun to produce, and – judging from your reactions – they are also fun to watch. However, time really flies in these videos, and absorbing all the details is difficult. Consequently, one of the most frequent questions you asked was this: Do you also offer “normal-speed” video tutorials? My answer was always something like this: I will do so in the future, so stay tuned!

 

You know what? The future is now!

 

In addition to the text-based recipes (tutorials) that have been the backbone of this website from the very beginning, I am starting to offer you video-based tutorials as well. Those video tutorials will be concise, covering a series of specific topics complementing the text-base tutorials and going beyond them. It will get even more hands-on as I will be able to really explain and show stuff.

Now, I am originally not a video guy. So, I had to learn lots of new stuff over the last few weeks – which was a lot of fun but also very time-consuming. This week, I am ready to step into the public and announce my new YouTube channel – the place where it will all happen for you. The short video above gives you a first impression of the new look and a sneak peek of the upcoming contents.

What can you expect?

As I already stated above, I will be publishing video tutorials regularly. In addition to that, I will be migrating the Making-of videos from the old YouTube channel to the new one gradually, and I will be giving them a facelift to make everything nice and consistent. Each video will be published in 1080p HD so that you can see and enjoy every detail.

How can you stay up-to-date?

As always, you have ample ways of staying up-to-date and getting the latest content as I publish it. I will be publishing each video here on farbspiel-photo.com. The videos will be hosted on my new YouTube channel. To make sure that you do not miss anything, simply subscribe here and on YouTube and be the first to get new content.

If you are a YouTube junkie, you may want to subscribe to the YouTube channel in any case. If that’s not enough, you can also receive updates through my Google+, Facebook and Twitter pages. Feel free to choose the one that suits you best – or all of them, if you like.

You see, there is really no excuse for missing a single one of my tutorials. ;-)

“…But wait, Bob! There’s more…”

Now, you may be thinking that that’s it, right? Au contraire, mon amie!

There is another – completely different – new format coming soon. I cannot give you any details yet, but if you like the recipes on this site, you will love this.

<in a whispering voice> But that’s just between you and me. So, psssst, don’t tell anybody. ;-)

HDR Cookbook – The Making of “The Green Room – Bebenhausen Palace, Germany (HDR)”

This video shows the entire post-processing work starting at the preparation of the images in Adobe Camera Raw all the way through to the finishing touches. Each major step is indicated by a subtitle.

View the final result and read more information on the post-processing work here: The Green Room – Bebenhausen Palace, Germany (HDR)

Also take a look at the before-and-after comparison of this image.

Remarks

  • This video is available in HD (1080p). Click the “YouTube” button to the lower right of the player above to go to the original video to watch it in HD. Important: You will have to switch the player to “1080p” to watch the HD version!
  • In HD mode, you can stop at any position and see the exact parameter setting I applied. Use the knob on the time bar to move forward and backward as the video is paused.


HDR Cookbook – The Making of “The Boat – Ko Panyi, Thailand (HDR)”

View the final result: The Boat – Ko Panyi, Thailand (HDR)

Remarks

This video is available in HD (1080p). Click the “YouTube” button to the lower right of the player above to go to the original video to watch it in HD. Important: You will have to switch the player to “1080p” to watch the HD version!

This video shows the post-processing work on this photo. It starts after the HDR creation and the tonemapping was finished.

HDR Cookbook – The Making of “Natural History Museum – London, United Kingdom (HDR)”

View the final result: Natural History Museum – London, United Kingdom (HDR)

Remarks

This video is available in HD (1080p). Click the “YouTube” button to the lower right of the player above to go to the original video and watch it in HD. Important: You will have to switch the player to “1080p” to watch the HD version!

This video shows the post-processing work on this photo. It starts after the HDR creation and the tonemapping was finished.

HDR Cookbook – The Making of “St. John’s Co-Cathedral – Valletta, Malta (HDR Vertorama)”

View the final result: St. John’s Co-Cathedral – Valletta, Malta (HDR Vertorama)

Remarks

This is the first making of video of my HDR processing. You will also find this video in my flickr stream. I decided to publish such material outside of flickr using other services that offer more features and flexibility.

Enjoy!