Posts

How to fix your underexposed photos in Photoshop

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Yes, we should all try to get the exposure right for every single photo we take. But hey, sometimes it just doesn't work. Maybe you're in a hurry or you just weren't ready for the moment when it happened. What can you do? Well, if you have Photoshop, you can still try to save your image if it's underexposed. In this featured video tutorial, Howard Pinsky shows you how it works if you have a RAW image and what you can do if you only have a JPG.

When to Save As What - Photoshop file formats explained

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When it comes to editing your photos, Photoshop might already seem complex enough. But have you ever given any deeper thought as to which file format is best for which occasion when you're saving your work? You surely know JPG as that's the de facto standard for uploading and viewing photos on the web. Maybe you know that the alternative PNG format allows you to have transparency in your images but is not as good at compressing photos. But there are many other options to choose from that are far better suited for a variety of cases. In this video, Photoshop Principal Product Manager Bryan O'Neil Hughes explaines the most important of these formats and answers the question as to when to use which format.

How to recover highlight details using luminosity masks

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Luminosity masking is a technique by which you can create layer masks from a photo based on the brightness (luminosity) values of its pixels. Such a mask can be used to add adjustments only to the bright parts of an image without touching the dark tones at all (or vice versa). In this excerpt from my video course "Mask It Like a Pro!" I will show you how to use luminosity masks to get back the details in a washed-out sky. We will first create a luminosity mask. Then, we will use a Levels adjustment and the Lasso tool on the mask to refine it so that it only reveals the sky. Finally, we will add a targeted Curves adjustment layer with that mask to really pull out the details in the sky.

Cheetyr - Find any Photoshop shortcut in a split second

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Cheetyr is a new website created by William Leeks that lets you search and find the right keyboard shortcut for Photoshop (and other tools) in a split second. No more searching on lengthy websites! Cheetyr is one of those tools that makes me think "Why didn't I think of this? Hmmmm...". It's so simple, but yet so useful. It's an extremely simple website (no clutter, no unnecessary information) that presents a list of keyboard shortcuts and lets you search that list very efficiently.

How to integrate text into your photos in Photoshop

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In this video, Aaron Nace from Phlearn.com explains how to use the Vanishing Point filter in Photoshop to place any text (or other content) onto an image and have Photoshop fit it automatically into the perspective of the image. He shows how to use layer styles and some other tricks to sell the illusion.

4 Essential layer masking tools in Photoshop

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Layer masking is one of the most essential skills when you are using Photoshop or Photoshop Elements. In this article, I will give you an overview of the most important tools that Photoshop provides for creating layer masks. I will quickly run you through the basics of layer masks before we go on to the more advanced techniques like channel masks and paths. This will give you a set of tools that you can use in many different situations.

Step up your Photoshop game - Mask It Like a Pro!

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Layer masking is undoubtedly one of the most fundamental skills you need in order to master Photoshop. Mask It Like a Pro! is our 6-hour video course that teaches you these skills from the ground up. It was designed for beginners and advanced Photoshop users alike. Watch the the video below to get an overview of the course and each individual chapter.

Hands-on Photo Tip: Creating Truly Realistic HDR Images with Adobe Camera Raw

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In this Hands-on Photo Tip, I will show you a really cool way to create a realistic-looking HDR image with a completely non-destructive workflow. We're going to use a feature in Photoshop CS6 that allows you to merge your source photos and bring the resulting 32 bit HDR image into Adobe Camera Raw (or Lightroom) to tone map it.

HDR Before and After: Into the Open

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This is the before-and-after comparison of "Into the Open (HDR)". At the top, you see the twelve original source images straight out of the camera. This image is based on a 12-shot exposure series with shutter speeds between 30s and 1/60s.
Into the Open (HDR) - twelve exposures, tonemapped in adobe camera raw

Into the Open (HDR)

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It's always good to try something new, right? Well, with this image, I did just that. Most of my previous HDR images where created using the Details Enhancer method in Photomatix. This time, I tried a new workflow that makes use of some new features in Photoshop CS6 and Adobe Camera Raw. I actually bypassed Photomatix completely with this image and did the tone mapping with Adobe Camera Raw (ACR).

Hands-on Photo Tip: Single Exposure Blending

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In this Hands-on Photo Tip, I will show you how to develop two separate versions of a single RAW image file and blend them together in Photoshop. One version is optimized for the highlights and the other one is optimized for the shadows. In this way, you can work on the different regions of your image separately which gives you much more flexibility for optimizing the overall photo.

Hands-on Photo Tip: Non-destructive Editing in Photoshop

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In this Hands-on Photo Tip, I will show you the basics of non-destructive editing. If you want to be flexible in your photo editing workflow, and if you want to avoid spending more time on an image than you actually need to, this is the way to go.

Hands-on Photo Tip: Work Faster with Background Saving in Photoshop CS6

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In this Hands-on Photo Tip, you will learn how the Save in Background feature of Photoshop CS6 can be a real time-saver. You can now save a file while you carry on working on it. Photoshop will save all the changes done before you told it to save the image. Especially if you are working with large Photoshop projects (e.g. panoramas or files with many layers) this can speed up your workflow and avoid frequent interruptions.

How to Use Batch Processing in Photoshop

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Oftentimes, photo editing entails a number of routine tasks that consume a lot of time when you do them manually. In this tutorial, I show you how to use Photoshop's action feature and the batch processing capabilities to have these tasks done for you automatically. This helps you save a lot of time and concentrate on more important things.
The Parliament (HDR) - six exposures - photomatix and photoshop

The Parliament (HDR)

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This is a 6-exposure HDR image of the Hungarian Parliament in Budapest, Hungary. Before I went on that trip, I did my usual Internet scouting on the entire city of Budapest, and sure enough, I came across a ton of images of this Parliament building. So, I was prepared! But when I arrived there and set up my tripod just across the river (Danube), something strange happened.

HDR Making-of: The Parliament (HDR)

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This is the Making-of video for 'The Parliament (HDR)'. Watch how this image evolves through all the post-processing stages and stop at any position to inspect the parameter settings (see remarks below). This video shows the entire post-processing work starting with the HDR merging and the tone-mapping all the way through to the finishing touches. Each major step is indicated by a subtitle. Watch it in full HD mode (1080p) full-screen and pause at any point to inspect the parameters I choose for the different tools involved in the post-processing.
HDR Before and After: The Parliament

HDR Before and After: The Parliament

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This is the before-and-after comparison of "The Parliament (HDR)". At the top, you see the three original source images straight out of the camera. This image is based on a 6-shot exposure series with shutter speeds between 0.6s and 15s. At the lower left, you see the result of merging those shots into a 32-bit HDR and subsequent tone-mapping using the Details Enhancer option of Photomatix Pro 4.2. And finally, at the lower right, you see the final image after a number of post-processing steps executed in Photoshop CS6.
Light my Way (HDR Vertorama)

Light my Way (HDR Vertorama)

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This is a 12-shot HDR Vertorama taken at the St. Micheal’s Cathedral in Toronto, Canada. See all the processing details and the before-and-after.
Before and After comparison of the 12-exposure HDR Vertorama 'Light my Way'. Created with Photoshop and Photomatix

HDR Before and After: Light my Way (HDR Vertorama)

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This is the HDR before and after comparison of "Light my Way (HDR Vertorama)". The final image was created from 4x3 TIFF files (4 series of 3 autobracketed RAW images, +2, 0, -2EV that were converted to TIFFs using Abobe Camera RAW). You can see the 12 source images in the left three columns. These images were merged into 4 32-bit HDRs and tone-mapped with Photomatix Pro 4.2 (Details Enhancer option) using the same settings for each image. The resulting 4 16-bit TIF images where then stitched using Photoshop CS5. The result of the stitching, perspective correction, cropping, and retouching can be seen in the middle column. In the right column, you see the final image after a number of post-processing steps executed in Photoshop CS6.

Hands-on Photo Tips: How to create a spotlight effect in Photoshop

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Do your photos look flat? Do you want to add some more interesting lighting effects to them in post-processing? You should really try to get the lighting right in camera while you're shooting. But sometimes, the light just isn't right when you are shooting, or maybe you want to achieve some different look when you post-process the image. In those cases, you can fix the image to a certain degree. In this video, I am going to show you a simple trick for creating a spotlight effect in Photoshop to improve the overall lighting.